T O P

What's up this culture of only focusing on "victims"?

What's up this culture of only focusing on "victims"?

Poison-Pen-

I’m not sure what you mean- but say a woman is mugged and beaten up and a hero comes in and saves her- great for him but she’s got both physical and mental issues that must be dealt with The hero, is recognized, but the victim is the one that was subjected to the pain, hurt and needs the actual help. A true hero isn’t looking for glory. They are there to help. And that is never looked down upon. Hence my confusion about what you’re sharing. Can you give me a specific example?


JudgmentMoto

Maybe I used the word "hero" too much. That was just an example. I mean simple stuff like "If you have a good life, you have no saying."


Poison-Pen-

I find that not to necessarily be true. But I do understand that those with trauma or that have a lot to overcome are given specific types of attention or resources and for good reasons - because they need the extra support and attention. It doesn’t make anyone else less than, it’s just that not everyone needs the same amount of level of assistance. I hear this similar argument when people are upset that someone is giving food to kids or that public assistance is given to those in need. “I didn’t get help/need help why do they?” Again. It’s not to say one person is more important than another- just has differing needs.


EllaShue

I think it depends on how you're defining heroes. I see a lot of high regard for people who are leading the way in many fields, including medicine, education, art, and social change. In fact, I feel there is a great deal of focus on people who are leading the way toward innovation, artistic vision, or brighter futures. I wouldn't normally ask a question to answer a question, but how do you define hero in such a way that you are not seeing these people honored? Whom do you think is not being given praise who deserves it?


JudgmentMoto

Maybe I used the word "hero" too much. That was just an example. I also mean simple stuff like "If you have a good life, you have no saying."


EllaShue

I kind of get what you're saying, but I think the analogy here is a house on fire. If someone's house is on fire, it doesn't make sense to focus most of the water on the houses that are not near the fire; you direct effort to the house that's burning. There is a little bit of "sit down and listen" being told to people who are perceived to have it good or easy in some way. It may not always be kind or polite, but it's understandable if you recast it into various perspectives that might be applicable to you. For instance, if you couldn't afford college tuition and heard a friend say that she was really upset that she only got a Volvo and not a Lexus as her high school graduation gift, and now her life is just *ruined*, you might want to tell her to shut up. I think a more constructive way to think about it is "If you have a good life, think about some of the reasons why and understand that other people may have different experiences and burdens." If I have a Volvo, I'm not going to cry about not getting a Lexus to my friend who will have to forgo college altogether because of money; it would be unconscionably self-absorbed of me.


SprinklesOfFun

Heroes are people who help victims though. And in order to help victims, you need to listen to them to understand how you could help.